Go Beyond the Headline

April 14, 2016

by Dan Ward

The CIO.com headline, “6 ways Twitter can help your business go beyond PR” quickly grabbed my attention.  Maybe I could learn something about how to use Twitter to go beyond traditional PR techniques.

But after reading the article, I think the headline writer may have a mistaken impression of public relations … since each of the “6 ways” already falls within the PR practitioner’s toolbox.

  1. Lead Generation/Customer Acquisition – PR pros use Twitter not only to engage with existing customers, but also to grow an organization’s customer base.  “Reward your Twitter followers with special promotions and flash sales”?  Yep, we do that.
  2. Recruiting – Our agency, and I’m sure many others, often works with clients to manage public relations strategies targeting the best and brightest future employees, and Twitter is one channel often used for recruitment messaging.
  3. Market Research – Anyone who has ever studied public relations knows that in the “RPIE” acronym used to outline PR plans, “R” stands for research.  And it always comes first.  As we say often at Taking Aim, you can’t fire until you first find your target.
  4. Event Marketing – Good advice here from author Jennifer Lonoff Schiff on using Twitter’s advertising features for event promotion, a core practice area for many PR pros.
  5. Customer Service – Yes, indeed, Twitter is a great customer service tool, and increasingly customers see it as a primary tool for communication with a company.  Companies who manage this successfully are those that involve the PR team crafting the customer service message.
  6. Media Relations – Pretty sure media relations does not “go beyond” PR.  It often begins and ends with PR, and I completely agree with the author that Twitter is a tremendous resource.  We often use Twitter not only to research and identify media contacts, but also as the primary communication channel for pitching stories. And reporters increasingly use Twitter to find resources.  Smart PR pros follow reporters who cover their areas of expertise, and regularly monitor their feeds to mine story opportunities.

Looking beyond the headline, the story clearly offers some good suggestions for practitioners to consider for future PR programs.  One hopes we can use such tools to educate headline writers about the work we do.


Who Writes the Headline?

January 20, 2016

by Roger Pynn

As part of our Message Matrix® training program, we often tell clients who are preparing for media interviews to try to “write the headline.”

In other words, imagine what you would like – in your fondest dreams – to be the headline of a story about you or your organization or product, and then speak in terms of that dream.

I’ll give Volkswagen CEO Matthias Mueller a bit of the benefit of the language barrier, but I’m sure the last headline he wanted to see was “We are not a criminal brand” as appeared in USA Today after he appeared at an event in Detroit in conjunction with the Detroit Auto Show.

Here’s a tip:  assume that the meatiest thing you say will make the best headline and make sure it is well done.  If it is blood-dripping rare, you’ll hate the headline.


Happy Headlines

December 23, 2010

by Roger Pynn

I carp on headline writers often enough that I thought it my year-end duty to point to some that make me happy.  They ought to make you happy, too, and they have nothing to do with how the headlines were written.

Instead, they fall into the “good news” category … and prove that when there is good news to report media will tell the story.

I like this one the most because it tells me there is light at the end of this terrible tunnel we’ve been driving through since late 2008.

In the same vein, this one tells me consumers have money to spend again, and that means people are making money.  Hopefully they are making it through gainful employment rather than crime or gambling.

And I like this one because when I’m really old, I have less fear that there will be phone cords to trip on as I totter around.  You see, there’s a silver lining to every cloud.

As the year draws to a close, I hope the headlines bring a smile to you, too.



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