The Making of a Holiday Message

December 18, 2017

by Dan Ward

Each year, Curley & Pynn attempts (and usually succeeds) to develop a holiday card that ties back either to the practice of public relations or, more frequently, to issues that have made news in the past year.

We mailed a “hanging chad” card after the 2000 election, made fun of news polls that missed so badly in 2016, and lampooned the ACA rollout by launching our own FrostyCare Marketplace.

This year, we set out to find something from 2017 that we could turn into a positive, and hopefully funny, holiday message.  And we failed.  We pored through headline after headline, and became increasingly depressed.  Political fights, natural disasters and dozens of harassment claims do not lend themselves to fun, festive jokes.

And then it came to us.  What we all need after a year of depressing headlines is what we all turn to (some of us secretly) to lift our spirits … pictures of kittens and puppies!

And so we present the C&P 2017 holiday card, featuring headshots of our own four-legged friends and family.  We hope it brings you a little “Paws-itivity” for the year ahead.  And we also hope you can pay it forward with a little pawsitivity of your own.  Share photos of your own furry, fuzzy family members with the tags #CandP #Pawsitivity.  We can all use some positive news and images this holiday season. Happy Holidays!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our thanks to Jim Hobart and Macbeth Studios for a fun, tail-wagging photo shoot!


Curses!

March 2, 2016

by Roger Pynn

The media love a train wreck (see the 2016 Presidential race).  The only thing they seem to love even more is a troubled cruise line (see the tribulations of Carnival and Costa).

And now they have another.

But they also love to give names to sensational stories.  My first recollection of that was Watergate, the break-in by Nixon political operatives to a Washington, D. C., office complex by that name that has since spawned countless “gates,” so named by media before the birth of the hashtag.

One has to wonder when someone will sue a headline writer for defamation.


Hashtag Politics

August 19, 2014

by Kim Taylor

Political campaigns have entered an entire new arena with the addition of social media to a candidate’s campaign.  Campaign advertising on television is now heartily supplemented by Facebook pages and Twitter feeds.  And, nowhere is that more apparent than in our own state governor’s race … in particular, in Charlie Crist’s second attempt at winning the seat.

If you’ve seen at least one of Crist’s ads on TV, you might’ve noticed the catchy #ShadyRick hashtag referring, of course, to his opponent and current governor, Rick Scott.  It caught my eye because it’s the first time I recall seeing a hashtag deliberately used as part of a campaign.

And, while hashtags can often be abused and overused, their intentional use can be very effective.  The incorporation of hashtags into other mediums such as Facebook and Instagram make them even more powerful.

Suppose you’re not really into politics or are unfamiliar with a candidate.  A simple search of Crist’s #ShadyRick hashtag will yield pages and pages of reading material.  An added benefit for the candidate is that popular hashtags often become trending topics garnering a topic even more attention.

Of course, as with all social media, results can’t always be predicted and since the use of hashtags is organic and can be used by anyone, you can expect an outlier or two.  I’m almost certain the #ShadyRick pictured below is not our current governor.  Choose your hashtags wisely.

shadyrick


So #Yesterday

February 19, 2014

by Roger Pynn

When I saw this article by Matt Shaw in the Council of Public Relations Firms’ blog Voice, it struck me that the alphabet is no longer 26 letters, but rather 26 letters and a single character.

How long do you think it will be before another character takes on the hashtag?  Can that thing above the three survive?  After all, if it has become a letter, as the producers of #RichKids of Beverly Hills suggest in titling their new show to appeal to a new generation, the # has to be so #yesterday.

As if to offer the answer, now comes Birds Eye, the frozen veggie maker, offering a frozen potato in the shape of symbols stolen from the keyboard by social media.

#Lord.  #Have.  #Mercy.


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