Do Good. All the Time.

June 27, 2016

by Ashley Tinstman

In the days since the tragedy in Orlando, our city has experienced immense pain, sadness and shock.  But in spite of our grief, we’ve also experienced something positive—incredible strength and resiliency.  As we collectively come to terms with what took place in the city we call home, the outpouring of love and support has been absolutely inspiring.

While local citizens have come together to give blood, donate money and volunteer their time, the response from dozens—if not hundreds—of companies, both large and small, has been equally as impressive.  Just a quick Google search will yield countless stories highlighting various companies and how they’re supporting the community.

Take JetBlue, for example.  As has been widely reported, the airline is offering free seats to and from Orlando for the immediate family members and domestic partners of the victims.  The company also made a $100,000 donation to the OneOrlando fund.  Similarly, Comcast NBCUniversal, parent company of Universal Orlando Resort, generously donated $1 million to the OneOrlando fund.

In the hours following the tragedy, Publix quickly mobilized to hand out free food, water and ice to first responders and others affected by the shooting.  UnitedHealth Group also showed extraordinary support by opening its mental health counseling help lines to anyone in need—whether they had insurance or not.

I could go on and on with dozens more examples—and that doesn’t even include the many bars, restaurants and local businesses holding fundraisers.  But my point in sharing all that is this:  It’s good to see companies doing good.  But giving back and supporting a community shouldn’t be a temporary thing.  It should be a way of life in business.

After tragedies such as this, it’s easy to come together, donate your resources and then go back to business as usual.  But “doing good” should be part of your company culture—all year long.  And I’m not talking about writing a few checks to a worthy cause out of obligation.  This is about creating a culture where it’s a natural part of your business on a regular basis.  Not only will those you support benefit from it, but so will your employees, your reputation and, ultimately, your brand.


A New Source for Business News in Orlando

April 7, 2015

by Dan Ward

Interesting announcement from the Orlando Sentinel today regarding its new subscriber-only digital publication for Central Florida’s business community.

GrowthSpotter (a name sure to spawn some dermatologist jokes), is being billed as a daily newsletter that can be read in 10 minutes, giving business users “an edge to help them make smart decisions.”  If the trademark filing is any indication, the Sentinel may have plans to expand beyond business coverage into news regarding “social and cultural development” as well.

No word yet on pricing, but the Sentinel promises content developed by a new team of business journalists and provided to subscribers “before it’s reported somewhere else.”

That’s a worrisome phrase, suggesting that content may not be exclusive to subscribers, but merely provided to them before being published on other Sentinel platforms.

If it works, it could create a badly needed revenue boost for the Orlando Sentinel Media Group, though it remains to be seen whether the local business community will invest in the service.  It also will be interesting to follow whether the focus on GrowthSpotter will have any impact on the Sentinel’s existing business coverage, which has been expanding in recent months.

At the very least, it’s a new resource for Central Florida’s PR community to follow, and could provide new opportunities for us to share information about our clients and companies with those who have an interest in Orlando’s continued growth.


A Rare Find

April 25, 2014

by Roger Pynn

When WKMG’s Lauren Rowe announced her retirement, the Central Florida media market lost more than a pretty face.  Gone will be a sense of insight rare today.  Lauren did more than report.  She probed – not in the aggressive, combative mode of so many, but rather from an educated sense of interest in her topic.

Her contribution to public service programming in this city is unmatched.  She always did her homework.  Lauren Rowe got more thoughtful information on the table during her Flashpoint programs than any other on local television.  In so many ways, she brought network quality to the screen.

She knew how to be tough when needed.  She projected a professional image.  And she knew how to be human, to let her guard down and to take a genuine interest in what others were talking about.  She’ll be missed.


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