Tide: A Swift and Clean Response to the #TidePodChallenge

February 9, 2018

by Bailey Morris

You know you have a PR crisis on your hands when the CEO of your organization has to talk about teenagers eating laundry pods on the weekly earnings call.

Nowadays when a brand faces a PR crisis, it’s regular procedure to take to their social media channels and address the issue head-on.  And before Tide tackled all of their competition in their quirky, bait-and-switch Super Bowl ads, they were keeping plenty busy tackling conversations about the “Tide Pod Challenge” on social media.

Like other daft internet challenges before its time, (“The Cinnamon Challenge,” “The Bath Salt Challenge,” etc.) the “Tide Pod Challenge” took the internet by storm, as teens began filming themselves biting into the brand’s laundry detergent pods and spewing soap everywhere – or worse, ingesting it.

We’re all about innovative solutions here at Curley & Pynn, and when we saw Tide’s creative response to the situation at hand, we had to write a blog post about it.

Instead of just posting a tweet that read, “Tide Pods are not meant for consumption.  If consumed please call poison control immediately,” Tide created a brief, funny PSA with New England Patriots’ tight-end Rob Gronkowski and posted it on their Twitter, Facebook and YouTube accounts.

Right now, the tweet has about 98,000 re-tweets and boasts about 10 million views – and that doesn’t even take into account the 286,000 views on YouTube and 164,000 views on Facebook!  They found a way to get their message across that it’s absurd to eat Tide Pods, but doing it in a comical way.

But why the larger amount of views on Twitter?  My theory is that it could be due to the Tide Pod Challenge originating on Twitter, and that’s where Tide knew most of their teen audience was posting about the challenge … but that’s another blog post for another time.

At the end of the day, it’s about remembering that public relations is “people relations.”  Tide can’t control what able-minded individuals do with their product – all they can do is tell them that it’s ludicrous, and that they shouldn’t do it.

So why not have a little fun with it?  After all, 10 million video views is nothing to sneeze at.  Unless you have laundry soap in your nose – then you might need to sneeze.


Super Bowl Ads are Popular, but are They Effective?

January 30, 2014

jhallby Julie Hall

Many of the ads that will be shown during the Super Bowl this weekend have already been shared online, and for good reason.  It’s understandable that companies would want to expand their reach when the rate for a 30-second spot during the Super Bowl has topped $4 million this year (and of course that doesn’t include the cost of production, talent, agency fees, etc.).

Although Super Bowl ads are certainly entertaining and many go viral online before they’re ever seen on TV, they may not be effective at the one metric that matters most from a business perspective—increased sales.  A recent study found that 80 percent of Super Bowl ads fail to increase sales or consumers’ purchase intent, in contrast to 60 percent of non-Super Bowl ads that were found to be ineffective by these measures.

There certainly are other advantages for running a Super Bowl ad, including brand positioning and awareness and that’s the lesson all marketers should take from this study.  Any communications tactic, whether it’s a 30-second Super Bowl ad, a news release, a special event or anything in between, should always be done with a constant focus on meeting the intended strategic objective.


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