!!NOW HIRINIG!!

July 5, 2018

by Heather Keroes

Do I have your attention?  Between the all-caps headline, exclamation points and obvious misspelling of “hiring,” I’d say this blog post is hard to miss.  I found inspiration from a number of blunders in the following job ad, printed in the Orlando Sentinel last week.  Go ahead, take a look.

While I cringed at the typos throughout and overall design, the real crime lay in its call-to-action.  Imagine you are applying for one of these positions.  You go to your computer and type in the following:

I tried it out.  It took me a minute and a half to enter the URL into my browser, oh so carefully to get it right, and my fingers are usually ablaze at the keyboard.  Admittedly, I had to hit backspace several times.  They could have saved their applicants a lot of grief with a vanity URL.

This ad may have originally been designed for online placement (a very lengthy one, at that), but even so, why the need for such a long URL? Why no consideration of its other uses?

No matter the form of communication, consider your medium.  Does your communication work across different channels?  And please (pretty please), ask someone to proofread.

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In full disclosure, Curley & Pynn represents Universal Orlando Resort.  My comments are my opinion and not meant to be a swipe at Disney (where I began my career and learned so much) or Planet Hollywood (where I enjoy eating), in any way.


The Power of Print.

June 29, 2018

by Roger Pynn

Sometimes print is still the most powerful medium.

Today’s Annapolis Capital Gazette editorial page is simply overwhelming.

As a former journalist who spent many hours in newsrooms toiling alongside colleagues who loved that business with all their hearts, I can’t imagine having the strength this team had today to pick themselves up and tell the horrible story that they are living through.

The otherwise blank page reads:

“Today, we are speechless.

 

“This page is intentionally left blank today

to commemorate victims of Thursday’s shootings

at our office.

 

“Gerald Fischman

Rob Hiaasen

John McNamara

Rebecca Smith

Wendi Winters

 

“Tomorrow this page will return to its steady

purpose of offering our readers informed

opinion about the world around them, that

they might be better citizens.”


Relationships Are a Two-Way Street

May 24, 2018

by Kacie Escobar

As much as I’d like to believe myself to be the next Paul Rand (designer of IBM, UPS, ABC and other world-famous corporate logos), the truth is my graphic design skills don’t go much further than a customized template in Canva.  While this often does the trick, I’m smart enough to know when it’s time to call in the big guns.

It’s not uncommon for agencies like ours to partner with others when client work requires the development of creative assets that can’t always be managed in-house.  You might think that working with clients every day has taught me what it takes to be a good customer, but I was grateful today for a refresher.  Thanks to Evolve Design Group’s Mark Calvert, CDB Productions’ Vivian Richardson and Macbeth Studio’s Jim Hobart for reminding me how to be a good client during today’s meeting of the FPRA Orlando Area Chapter.

Here’s what our guest speakers had to say:

  • Check your expectations.  Key to a successful partnership is realistic expectations – not just deep pockets.  It can be equally rewarding to work with a small company on a tight budget if their expectations are realistic and they understand the value of services being rendered.  Good clients realize the finished product is often more complicated to create than it looks.  They also understand that no one works for free.
  • Don’t try teaching a cat to fetch.  Get a dog.  In other words, do your research to ensure the vendor is a good fit for your project.  If you don’t already have vendor relationships, Google should be your best friend.  Conduct research to find vendors who deliver the service you seek.  Review their case studies and portfolios, years of experience and staff size, and narrow down the list based on your priorities.  Check references if their client list is public.  Only then will you be ready to reach out.
  • Know what you want.  What does success look like to you? Define what you want to accomplish before reaching out.  Develop a project brief summarizing your vision, including the problem or opportunity you face, the audience you aim to reach, your plan to use the deliverables, ideal timeline and budget.  Your vendor will then have enough information to provide educated recommendations and guide you in the right direction based on their expertise.
  • Trust.  No one likes being micromanaged.  Before you jump in to control the creative process, think about how much time and money your partners have invested into honing their craft, and why you’ve called upon their expertise rather than attempting to do the work on your own.  The best clients provide constructive feedback and respect the creative process.

Just like any relationship, the client-vendor relationship is a two-way street.  On behalf of Curley & Pynn and our agency colleagues, I hope you’ll keep these insights under consideration next time you’re looking to engage a vendor.


Q&A with Karen Kacir, the Newest Addition to Our Team

April 30, 2018

by Karen Kacir

Following 11 months in Colombia as an English teacher for the Peace Corps, former intern Karen Kacir is back with the Curley & Pynn team as our newest communications specialist.

Read on to learn more about this quick-witted member of our office family.

What motivated you to pursue a career in public relations?

I’ve always been fascinated by creative storytelling.  Having come of age in the era of social media, I was drawn to businesses and nonprofits that used compelling narratives to cut through the clutter and make themselves heard.  I liked the idea of learning to communicate smarter, not louder.

What is your favorite memory of being in Colombia with the Peace Corps?

I had the chance to live with three host families during my time in Colombia.  Without a doubt, the members of my families were some of my closest friends.  One of my host moms, Gloria, has a special place in my heart – she could sense when I was having a bad day (or, could understand my broken Spanish when I tried to communicate that I was feeling down) and would brighten it up without fail.  Once, to cheer me up, she took me on a hike through the pueblo in a downpour.  When her concerned neighbors asked what she was doing, she replied that it was the perfect weather for a walk.  Her humor, kindness and indefatigable optimism stand out very clearly in my mind as a highlight of my time at site.

If you had to present on any topic without preparation, what would it be?

I could probably lead a presentation on all things related to bullet journaling, including how to make the journal itself out of printer paper, embroidery floss and a record sleeve.

What do you enjoy doing in your spare time?

Swing dancing!

If you could have a superpower, what would it be and why?

I would want to be able to teleport and take other people with me.  Not only would it eliminate my commute, but I’d also have the ability to spend more time with my loved ones scattered around the globe.


Our Takeaways from Cision’s 2018 Global State of the Media Report

April 27, 2018

by Karen Kacir

Cision just published its 2018 Global State of the Media Report, a survey of more than 1,300 journalists’ perceptions of the media and communications industries.  Participants shared their thoughts on how communications professionals can craft pitches and press releases that won’t get ignored, the perceived trustworthiness of PR content and much more.

You can download the full report on Cision’s website.  Here are some highlights:


Five Tips for Landing Your Dream Internship

April 25, 2018

by Stefania Markowicz

My time with Curley & Pynn as an intern has come to an end, so I’d like to offer some tips for students or recent graduates looking to land a fabulous internship (hopefully this one!).

  1. Personalize your online profiles – and keep them clean.

I guarantee employers will “Google” your name during the application process, so make sure that your online profiles are clean and informative.  And, after you land the internship or job, keep updating your online presence.  Your profiles should be an authentic display of your character both in and out of the office.

  1. Try something outside your comfort zone.

Prior to joining the C&P team, I was sure I never wanted to work at an agency.  Silly me.  This was, in part, because I was nervous that I would be overwhelmed with work and deadlines.  But nerves are good – a sign that what you are doing is important.  Turns out, I really enjoyed the agency environment.  In just four months, I was exposed to a broad range of essential PR skills, from writing and research to media outreach, and those skills were applied in several different PR sectors, from high tech to tourism.  So, challenge yourself.  Walk the edge.  Diversify.  Only then, will you succeed.

  1. Pay attention to the details.

C&P juggles many client projects, which is why efficiency is important.  Before submitting them to your supervisor, make sure first drafts are as close to final as possible.  That means fact-checking your information and triple-checking your grammar and punctuation.  The same applies to internship or job application materials – it’s not a great reflection of your skills if your resume and cover letter are full of typos.

  1. Go above and beyond.

Whether you’re assigned a project at work or an assignment at school, always give 101 percent. That extra 1 percent is a testament to your effort, dedication and passion, and will set you apart when applying to top internships and jobs.

  1. Network.  Network.  Network.

Those co-workers and colleagues who were impressed with your work?  Yeah, they’re going to be the people recommending you for the next opportunity.  While you might have the qualifications, nothing beats the recommendation of a former supervisor to help you land the job.  Leverage your network of school and internship contacts to learn more about possible opportunities.  The PR industry in Orlando is a small world.

These tips have served me well in securing five internships along the way to pursuing my bachelor’s degree in advertising and public relations from the University of Central Florida.  As my journey continues with just two more semesters to complete, the next step is to determine which career path I’ll pursue.

After experiencing this internship program, C&P might just be part of my path.

The last four months I’ve spent at C&P have exceeded all my expectations.  I’m leaving this internship as a better communicator, all because of the incredible (and quirky) team here.


Death

April 17, 2018

by Roger Pynn

One thing you can look forward to when you die is that you won’t have to read the news.  After all, it is pretty depressing.

However, one thing you won’t read about is something many find depressing while they are still alive … death.

After monkeying with their publication of the news of death back in 2013 when it did away with the tradition of printing “Deaths in Central Florida,” the Orlando Sentinel brought back a limited version … but instead of treating it like news, they charged for even the simple three-line notices that include the deceased’s name, age, city and the name of their funeral home so friends could at least call to inquire about funeral services.

Last week they simply buried the whole thought that the dearly departed might matter to the paper’s readers, trading the space for large display ads.  The classified ad department told me that the average obituary takes up 36 lines at a cost of $505.  They do have a handy tool that allows you to write your loved one’s story, paste the text into a template and find out what it will cost … if you don’t die from the sticker shock yourself.

I’m an old news hound.  I made my living as a journalist for a long time.  I wrote a lot of obits in my day.  And I’ve read them every day of my life ever since … not out of morbid curiosity, but because if a friend has passed, I want to know it.  My bet is that I’m not unlike a lot of people … especially when they reach their 60s and 70s and going to funerals becomes a more routine part of life.

A quick check at OrlandoSentinel.com/opinion/letters doesn’t seem to show it, but the print edition has had at least a couple of passionate letters to the editor on this subject, including this:

I understand it costs a lot to run a newspaper.  It also costs to lose subscribers … whether it is due to their death or the disgust of families who dump their subscriptions … offended by decisions like this that choke every last dime out of the readers that real advertisers are trying to reach.


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