Taking Aim by the Numbers

July 12, 2018

by Karen Kacir

Ten years ago this month, Curley & Pynn launched Taking Aim.  Here’s a quick look at our blog by the numbers:

 


Top 10 Posts from 10 Years of Blogging

July 11, 2018

by Karen Kacir

On this day 10 years ago, Curley & Pynn published its first post on this blog.

Since 2008, our industry has seen dramatic changes in the way audiences are consuming and responding to media.  Meanwhile, we’ve maintained focus on helping corporate, government and nonprofit clients communicate with all who have an interest in their success.  And we’ve kept up with the times by constantly reminding ourselves of the tried and true advice from legendary archer Howard Hill, which also inspired the name of this blog.

Thank you for tuning in to Taking Aim since the beginning and sticking with us through the years.  We sincerely appreciate the time you’ve spent indulging our urge to share tips, musings, opinions and the occasional complaint, and hope our writing has been worth reading.

In honor of Taking Aim’s 10th birthday, here’s a roundup of the blog’s 10 most-viewed posts:

  1. YouTube vs. Vimeo – The Faceoff:  In 2011, we explored the differences between two of the top streaming services.
  2. Hate to Pester? Try Humorous Reminders:  A team member detailed how using wit can inspire client respect.
  3. Deathly Journalism:  An oversight at the obituaries desk led to a glowing feature on a convicted murderer.
  4. Censorship is a Good Thing:  How fatherhood informed one team member’s views on self-censorship.
  5. Target Me, Please:  Roger received a mysterious letter and gleaned some insight into targeted communications.
  6. Cracker Jack: It’s All About the Prize:  When Cracker Jack modernized its prize, Heather stepped up to bat.
  7. The CNN School of Journalism:  Dan issued a word of caution on CNN’s citizen journalism program, iReporter.
  8. Jennifer Aniston’s Sex Tape for Smartwater:  In 2011, Smartwater and Jennifer Anniston set out to make a viral video.  They succeeded.
  9. The End of the Internet:  Roger commented on a Wall Street Journal article predicting that the internet would run out of IP addresses.
  10. Black Wednesday:  Heather observed the rise of #altwiki following the Wikipedia blackout of 2012.

Breaking News: Three Takeaways from the Orlando Police Department’s PIO

July 10, 2018

by Karen Kacir

Last month, the FPRA Orlando Area Chapter reported to the Orlando Police Department Headquarters for a special session with Michelle Guido, Orlando Police Department’s public information officer (PIO). After 26 years in journalism, Guido became the police department’s first civilian PIO in 2013 and was tasked with radically re-evaluating how the agency told its story.  In a media landscape more difficult than ever to penetrate, Guido turned to Twitter.

When she started managing the Orlando Police Department’s Twitter account in 2013, it had amassed just over 600 followers.  Five years later, it now reaches over 122,000 – more than three times the number of 25- to 54-year-old viewers of Orlando’s most popular 6 p.m. TV news broadcasts.

Here are three takeaways from Guido’s presentation on leveraging this owned media channel:

1. Break your own news and remain the go-to source.

In 2017, Lt. Debora Clayton was fatally shot in a Walmart parking lot after attempting to apprehend murder suspect Markeith Loyd.  When the Orlando Police Department apprehended Loyd days later, this tweet went live within a minute.  By breaking the news on social media, the police department established itself as the source for information related to the case, driving media to its social channels for further information and updates.

2. Streamline communications.

At 3:15 a.m., June 12, 2016, Guido was informed about the shooting at Pulse Nightclub.  By 7 a.m., she had received 1,100 emails from media across the nation requesting more information.  After sending out a mass email directing all media to the Orlando Police Department’s Twitter account, she stowed her work phone and didn’t touch it for 10 days.

Responding to every outlet would have been an impossible task.  Even if Guido had been able to personally respond to a fraction of the inquiries, it would have required prioritizing some outlets over others.  By keeping the police department’s social channels updated, Guido ensured that all media outlets had access to critical information as it developed.

3. Control your message – for better or worse.

By cultivating a responsive social media channel, the Orlando Police Department has earned a robust following, which Guido leverages to tell the stories traditional media outlets might never pick up.  On the Orlando Police Department’s Twitter account, stories of rescued puppies and officers’ good deeds abound.  When the news is less palatable than puppies, a timely, transparent response circumvents public mistrust.

The Orlando Police Department’s strategic investment in social media has afforded a tremendous level of influence.  Traditional media has its place.  However, when preparing to break your next news story, consider looking no further than your own social media.

(Bonus!  Police Chief John Mina showed us that he’s social savvy, as well.)


Q&A with Karen Kacir, the Newest Addition to Our Team

April 30, 2018

by Karen Kacir

Following 11 months in Colombia as an English teacher for the Peace Corps, former intern Karen Kacir is back with the Curley & Pynn team as our newest communications specialist.

Read on to learn more about this quick-witted member of our office family.

What motivated you to pursue a career in public relations?

I’ve always been fascinated by creative storytelling.  Having come of age in the era of social media, I was drawn to businesses and nonprofits that used compelling narratives to cut through the clutter and make themselves heard.  I liked the idea of learning to communicate smarter, not louder.

What is your favorite memory of being in Colombia with the Peace Corps?

I had the chance to live with three host families during my time in Colombia.  Without a doubt, the members of my families were some of my closest friends.  One of my host moms, Gloria, has a special place in my heart – she could sense when I was having a bad day (or, could understand my broken Spanish when I tried to communicate that I was feeling down) and would brighten it up without fail.  Once, to cheer me up, she took me on a hike through the pueblo in a downpour.  When her concerned neighbors asked what she was doing, she replied that it was the perfect weather for a walk.  Her humor, kindness and indefatigable optimism stand out very clearly in my mind as a highlight of my time at site.

If you had to present on any topic without preparation, what would it be?

I could probably lead a presentation on all things related to bullet journaling, including how to make the journal itself out of printer paper, embroidery floss and a record sleeve.

What do you enjoy doing in your spare time?

Swing dancing!

If you could have a superpower, what would it be and why?

I would want to be able to teleport and take other people with me.  Not only would it eliminate my commute, but I’d also have the ability to spend more time with my loved ones scattered around the globe.


Our Takeaways from Cision’s 2018 Global State of the Media Report

April 27, 2018

by Karen Kacir

Cision just published its 2018 Global State of the Media Report, a survey of more than 1,300 journalists’ perceptions of the media and communications industries.  Participants shared their thoughts on how communications professionals can craft pitches and press releases that won’t get ignored, the perceived trustworthiness of PR content and much more.

You can download the full report on Cision’s website.  Here are some highlights:


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