NYTimes.com Transcends our Concept of “The Newspaper”

August 6, 2010

by Dionne Aiken

Visited nytimes.com lately?  Maybe you logged on during the World Cup

or to track the oil spill.  Well if you haven’t logged on lately you’re missing out.

In such a dynamic information arena, where consumers can get “info-on-demand,” via the Web, smart phone and tech devices in a matter of seconds, some newspapers continue the struggle to keep up – others, like The New York Times, remain forerunners by taking advantage of this dynamic platform.  They grab the reigns and race ahead transcending our concept of the newspaper and news delivery.

In a recent interview, Steve Duenes and Archie Tse from The New York Times graphics department talk about the extensive work that goes into creating all the graphics on the news site.  When you think about the size of the site, the amount of information and small window of turnaround time, this begins to look like a daunting task fit only for a magician.

Duenes & Tse say that starting with a simple (yet sophisticated) foundation is critical in creating graphics that are sustainable but also expandable so that as information is added they hold up over time.  This process involves a lot of painstaking work and sorting through data to effectively communicate data, stories and messages in the clearest manner possible.

The end result?  Their graphics direct in amazing story telling.

From climate changes timelines, to carbon dioxide emissions

interactive tours though Broadway

or the number of Frisks in NYC.

For journalist, editors, and designers alike message delivery and how we tell our story is an important task.  It’s just data but it really all depends on how you look at it.


Focus on the Customer

July 11, 2008

by Roger Pynn

Libraries are chock full of books – In Search of Excellence, The One Minute Manager and Good to Great – that make it crystal clear no business succeeds without a focus on the customer. It’s nothing new. More than 20 years ago we wrote a cultural statement for our firm, Curley & Pynn, that starts with this simple rule: Focus on what keeps the client awake at night.

So why can’t the newspaper industry figure out who the customer is? Everywhere you look newspapers are morphing into Web sites and forgetting the paying reader.

I’m not suggesting newspapers abandon the Web. By bringing meaningful content there they may just elevate the culture. But trying to make their print product into web pages is an insult. The trouble is that newspapers can’t seem to figure out how to make money any more, and while only 10% of their revenue is coming from the Internet according to an article by Kevin Heisler of Search Engine Watch, they are focusing what appears to be 90% of their attention in that space.

Take my hometown paper (and former employer back in the days of hot type) the Orlando Sentinel. Every day readers are faced with section front teasers driving them to “exclusive content” in one of the paper’s many reporter-written blogs. Which makes me think, why did I buy this paper?

Maybe somewhere out there in newspaperland there’s an R&D expert trying to figure out how to integrate newspaper coin boxes and web surfing terminals where .75 cents will buy you a paper but for four bits will let you scan it online.


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 58 other followers

%d bloggers like this: